Atmospheric Corrosion Studies in Cold Arctic Climate

SPACE TECHNOLOGY

Tyler Cushman

The main goal of my graduate research is to develop atmospheric corrosion test sites around the state of Alaska to collect corrosion data. The main focus of this atmospheric corrosion research is to measure aerosol chloride concentrations and study how this aerosol chloride concentration affects corrosion rates along with other weather parameters such as temperature, humidity, and time of wetness (TOW). Currently, there is no substantial information or research in this field in cold regions. This is a major concern because of how prominent structures exposed to such environments are in Alaska, and how crucial these structures are to the United States from a strategic standpoint. To fill this gap, I will be developing a linear regression model to predict the atmospheric corrosion rate based on the environmental conditions present. Collecting data is necessary to create these models, therefore I will be placing new, improved multi-angle corrosion test racks in key locations throughout the state. Not only will this give vital information about the effects of arctic environments on corrosion, but this project will develop future test sites and serve as a way for NASA and other entities to expedite their current methods of testing UV resistant coatings for corrosion protection.

Profile

Name: Tyler Cushman, Graduate Student

Institution: University of Alaska Anchorage

Mentor: Raghu Srinivasan, rsrinivasan2@alaska.edu

Award: Research Grant

Funding Period: 2021 to 2022